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Matthew Gast, Aerohive Director of Advanced Technology

Matthew Gast is Director of Advanced Technology at Aerohive Networks. He currently serves as chair of both the Wi-Fi Alliance's security task groups, was the first chair of the Wireless Network Management Marketing task group, and is the past chair of the IEEE 802.11 revision task group.Matthew is...

What does “software defined” mean? Matthew Gast answers.

In my recent discussions with customers, the phrase “software defined radio” has come up. As software increasingly takes over the functions of our electronic devices, it is natural to wonder how deeply we might depend on software to add future functionality. For example, can we use it to add new...

iBeacon Part 6: Beyond Retail

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. In this sixth and final installment in the series, I talk about iBeacon use cases beyond retail.  After last month’s iBeacon webinar, we kicked off several discussions on Aerohive's customer community. Much of the early conversation around iBeacons ...

iBeacon Part 5: Privacy

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. This is the fifth installment in the series, explaining how privacy issues are addressed with iBeacon.   Any time your phone starts interacting with remote services, there is naturally a question about privacy. The technology of iBeacons has some...

iBeacon Part 4: Ranging

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. This is the fourth installment in the series, explaining how iBeacon leverages ranging data.   Up to this point, the iBeacon series has focused on finding iBeacons and taking action. An additional benefit of the design of the iBeacon ecosystem is...

iBeacon Part 3: You need an app

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. This is the third installment in the series, explaining how iBeacon is nothing without an app.   As I discussed in part 2 of my blog series on iBeacons, an iBeacon works by transmitting three numbers. Receivers can then interpret these three...

iBeacon Part 2: How does it work?

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. This is the second installment in the series, explaining just how iBeacon works.  An iBeacon is a simple device, based on Bluetooth. To extend Bluetooth beyond the realm of audio devices, the Bluetooth SIG created Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE),...

iBeacon Part 1: What the heck is it?

This post kicks off the iBeacon series that I promised a couple of weeks ago in a blog. Thank you for all the suggestions on the community and in e-mail. iBeacons are exciting because they let you know what you are near. In a restaurant? Have your automatically check you in and act as the “your table...

Why we care iPhone 6 supports 802.11ac

When the iPhone 5 first came out, one of the major disappointments for me was that it didn’t have 802.11ac. Among the many new features in the iPhone 6 is that the Wi-Fi interface has been upgraded to 802.11ac. Why is this important? First up, it’s just plain faster. The maximum speed of a...

Oh, No! The Wi-Fi Alliance is almost old enough to drive

I remember the first time I saw Wi-Fi in action. Of course, it wasn’t called Wi-Fi then. Back in 1999, it was this cool technology – if you could get $2,000 for an AP and $300 for a card in every client you wanted! If a child had been born in 1999, his or her parents would now be dreading the...

Why is iBeacon important?

Note to readers: I’m writing a series about iBeacon. This is a good first post in the series, explaining why it’s important, and trying to blend it in with "wireless expertise." Over its history, Wi-Fi has continually reinvented itself so that it is intimately related to many other developments in...