Search Now

Wi-Fi Security »

Is your Wi-Fi Access Point secure?

What if the AP in your high school gym went missing? Or someone tampered with the AP in the back of your clothing store? Or a hacker paid a visit to his grandmother in her long term care facility and was able to access the building's Wi-Fi network? Wi-Fi security is always a major concern to...

This really CHAPs my hide

Last week at Defcon 20, Moxie Marlinspike released chapcrack, a tool that implements a new attack against MS-CHAPv2. It was widely reported as an attack on WPA2-Enterprise, but it’s not. In fact, from a Wi-Fi perspective, there’s nothing to see here.There’s been a great deal of coverage of the...

Private Pre-Shared Key to the Future!

In the world of cool Wi-Fi features, Aerohive's Private Pre-Shared Key is one that should get so much more airtime (haha, pun intended) but instead often ends up as one more awesome Aerohive feature mentioned in passing.The fact that our engineering team was able to provide a highly-secure,...

Details of the Wi-Fi Protected Setup brute-force attack and mitigation steps

Last week, my original post on the Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) brute-force attack promised a follow-up. In the meantime, I appeared as a guest on episode 2 of the No Strings Attached podcast with Dan Cybulskie and Andrew vonNagy.In some of the discussions I’ve had since then, it appears that...

What you need to know about the Wi-Fi Protected Setup attack

One of the Wi-Fi industry’s greatest accomplishments is the way that security went from being a major topic of interest ten years ago to a quality that is accepted as an inherent part of Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) had a great deal to do with that sea of change in my opinion.The upshot of...

How to meet the iPad demand for a scad of Wi-Fi signal strength

In July, Aerohive announced a new addition to our line-up of enterprise 802.11n wireless access points: the 3-spatial stream HiveAP 330 and HiveAP 350. Although there is a lot to like about them, today I want to dig down further into the radio card design that Devin first touched on in his post...

WEP: Still Crazy After These Ten Years

When talking about security on Wi-Fi networks, I will sometimes open with a statement like, “I have been around this industry so long that I remember when WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) was secure.” I also remember using products that didn’t implement the “optional” WEP because it was too taxing for...

Security in 802.11ac and 802.11ad: I feel the need … the need for speed

I’ve written previously about the possibilities for gigabit Wi-Fi coming with the future 802.11ac and 802.11adstandards. In today’s post, I’ll be taking a closer look about what that raw speed means for security. (As far as the title goes, well, let’s just say that in the mid-1980s, I was just...

Wi-Fi security, one user at a time

Reading John Cox’s recent article in NetworkWorld about Wi-Fi security made me pause, and think about how much the Wi-Fi Alliance has done to improve security on wireless LANs. My work with Wi-Fi began about a decade ago, when I brought my first AP home. It was a 2 Mbps AP, and it was powerful and...

A Bleg for Data on Deployment of Security Protocols in Wi-Fi Networks

I was recently elected chair of the Security Marketing task group at the Wi-Fi Alliance, and one of the projects we are working on could benefit from data on the deployment of different types of security.  That is, what fraction of wireless networks are open/WEP/WPA/WPA2? In the past, the task group...